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Artistes

Marty Ehrlich

À propos de Marty Ehrlich

Ehrlich embodies the term "musician's musician" due to his multi-instrumentalism (alto and soprano sax, flute, clarinet) and his ability to fit into nearly any context -- from chamber jazz to Modern Big Band, and from cerebral Post Bop with Andrew Hill to bluesy avant jazz with Julius Hemphill. His own albums, made less frequently due to his steady sideman jobs, are advanced yet always accessible, subtly incorporating outside elements (e.g. odd time signatures, dense harmonies, and chordless improvisation) into structured, swing-based frameworks.

356x237

Marty Ehrlich

Ehrlich embodies the term "musician's musician" due to his multi-instrumentalism (alto and soprano sax, flute, clarinet) and his ability to fit into nearly any context -- from chamber jazz to Modern Big Band, and from cerebral Post Bop with Andrew Hill to bluesy avant jazz with Julius Hemphill. His own albums, made less frequently due to his steady sideman jobs, are advanced yet always accessible, subtly incorporating outside elements (e.g. odd time signatures, dense harmonies, and chordless improvisation) into structured, swing-based frameworks.

À propos de Marty Ehrlich

Ehrlich embodies the term "musician's musician" due to his multi-instrumentalism (alto and soprano sax, flute, clarinet) and his ability to fit into nearly any context -- from chamber jazz to Modern Big Band, and from cerebral Post Bop with Andrew Hill to bluesy avant jazz with Julius Hemphill. His own albums, made less frequently due to his steady sideman jobs, are advanced yet always accessible, subtly incorporating outside elements (e.g. odd time signatures, dense harmonies, and chordless improvisation) into structured, swing-based frameworks.

À propos de Marty Ehrlich

Ehrlich embodies the term "musician's musician" due to his multi-instrumentalism (alto and soprano sax, flute, clarinet) and his ability to fit into nearly any context -- from chamber jazz to Modern Big Band, and from cerebral Post Bop with Andrew Hill to bluesy avant jazz with Julius Hemphill. His own albums, made less frequently due to his steady sideman jobs, are advanced yet always accessible, subtly incorporating outside elements (e.g. odd time signatures, dense harmonies, and chordless improvisation) into structured, swing-based frameworks.