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Artistes

Las Ketchup

À propos de Las Ketchup

Spanish teen sensations Las Ketchup are four sisters– (Lola, Lucia, Pilar and Rocio Munoz) who are the daughters of renowned flamenco guitarist Tomate. (Get it? Tomate is "tomato" in Spanish, ergo "ketchup.") Dangerously cute and well versed in delivering high-speed nonsense lyrics, they've clearly been primed for international stardom. "The Ketchup Song" (or "Asereje") became the breakout hit of 2002 everywhere but in the U.S., where it generated some buzz, although not with the fervor of, say, "Macarena." But Las Ketchup may yet survive one-hit-wonder status; little sister Rocio joined the group in 2006, and their quadruple-voiced attack, peppy Andalusian and reggae influences, and sleek lounge vibe on 2006's Un Blodymary sound extremely fresh.

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Paulina Rubio, Yelle

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Las Ketchup

Spanish teen sensations Las Ketchup are four sisters– (Lola, Lucia, Pilar and Rocio Munoz) who are the daughters of renowned flamenco guitarist Tomate. (Get it? Tomate is "tomato" in Spanish, ergo "ketchup.") Dangerously cute and well versed in delivering high-speed nonsense lyrics, they've clearly been primed for international stardom. "The Ketchup Song" (or "Asereje") became the breakout hit of 2002 everywhere but in the U.S., where it generated some buzz, although not with the fervor of, say, "Macarena." But Las Ketchup may yet survive one-hit-wonder status; little sister Rocio joined the group in 2006, and their quadruple-voiced attack, peppy Andalusian and reggae influences, and sleek lounge vibe on 2006's Un Blodymary sound extremely fresh.

À propos de Las Ketchup

Spanish teen sensations Las Ketchup are four sisters– (Lola, Lucia, Pilar and Rocio Munoz) who are the daughters of renowned flamenco guitarist Tomate. (Get it? Tomate is "tomato" in Spanish, ergo "ketchup.") Dangerously cute and well versed in delivering high-speed nonsense lyrics, they've clearly been primed for international stardom. "The Ketchup Song" (or "Asereje") became the breakout hit of 2002 everywhere but in the U.S., where it generated some buzz, although not with the fervor of, say, "Macarena." But Las Ketchup may yet survive one-hit-wonder status; little sister Rocio joined the group in 2006, and their quadruple-voiced attack, peppy Andalusian and reggae influences, and sleek lounge vibe on 2006's Un Blodymary sound extremely fresh.

Artistes similaires

À propos de Las Ketchup

Spanish teen sensations Las Ketchup are four sisters– (Lola, Lucia, Pilar and Rocio Munoz) who are the daughters of renowned flamenco guitarist Tomate. (Get it? Tomate is "tomato" in Spanish, ergo "ketchup.") Dangerously cute and well versed in delivering high-speed nonsense lyrics, they've clearly been primed for international stardom. "The Ketchup Song" (or "Asereje") became the breakout hit of 2002 everywhere but in the U.S., where it generated some buzz, although not with the fervor of, say, "Macarena." But Las Ketchup may yet survive one-hit-wonder status; little sister Rocio joined the group in 2006, and their quadruple-voiced attack, peppy Andalusian and reggae influences, and sleek lounge vibe on 2006's Un Blodymary sound extremely fresh.

Artistes similaires